THE SNOOP

We're snooping your pages.  We're creeping your posts.  We're sharing your stuff.
We will not discriminate.  (Although we will often poke fun.)

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Iran might just have more muscle than the USA

When we picture a "top bodybuilder," we usually imagine something distinctly American.  Perhaps stoic and aggressive from the some East Coast city, or else flashy and charming from the Western part of the country, no matter what the idea of a "world class bodybuilder" is something we imagine the product of the good ol' US of A.

The USA may ironically be the minority among the world's best competitive professional bodybuilders. Photo by Igor Kopcek of Eastlabs, via the IFBB website

The USA may ironically be the minority among the world's best competitive professional bodybuilders.
Photo by Igor Kopcek of Eastlabs, via the IFBB website

Which is why this Snoop is so much fun.  It was thrown to us from The Next Level pro-level drug-free bodybuilder Ali Rouhani (teammate on Atlas and team guide for the Spring 2016 team).  Ali is an Iranian with a passionate love for the USA, but truly a love for the vibrant citizens of his home country – who happen top be some of the best world-class athletes in a few distinct sporting arenas.  And you guessed it: high-level bodybuilding is one of them.

The natural bias of most US citizens is to presume we possess the best athletes in all sports.  But recently the USA was barely on the boards in one of the largest and most important global bodybuilding competitions, the IFBB World Championships.  (You can tell they want us to think it's important because it has the word "world" in it.)  While the US bodybuilders frantically chase their tales trying to gain distinction in the far flashier IFBB Mr. Olympia, the more challenging contest is the Worlds.

However, most Americans involved with the sport overlook the Worlds, conveniently ignoring that the USA barely makes a dent in the contest, and certainly is not as impressive as the Iranian showing – as well as a few other nations we in the USS don't often equate with bodybuilding.

While bodybuilding will always be a sport with deep ties in the Americas, perhaps it's high time we acknowledge that while we may possess the historical mythos, we don't necessarily corner the market on competitive talent.  

But then again, that might not be seen as the most American way to view it.