THE SNOOP

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We will not discriminate.  (Although we will often poke fun.)

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Maybe "Paleo" really is just a diet fad in clever science disguise.

Hunter-gatherers used this stone as a combination pestle and grinder to make flour from oats and other grains, says Marta Mariotti Lippi, a professor of botany at the University of Florence in Italy. Courtesy of Stefano Ricci, photo retrieved via NPR.

Hunter-gatherers used this stone as a combination pestle and grinder to make flour from oats and other grains, says Marta Mariotti Lippi, a professor of botany at the University of Florence in Italy.

Courtesy of Stefano Ricci, photo retrieved via NPR.

Somewhere in our blogs and writings, The Next Level has bashed the Paleo Diet fad.  Not because it doesn't have merit – many concepts associated with it are actually reasonable and clever.  Yet our biggest axe to grind has been with the illogic of it's name: the idea that somehow we should mimic the less-athletically-advanced Paleolithic Era man in order to advance our athletic athletic ends.  

That's like copying a behavioral obese person in order to figure out how to consume more protein.  

Now the two main points that drive us at The Snoop nuts is how Paleo Diet followers have a neb-religious reverence for the diet's dogma (thank you very much, bro-science CrossFit communities!), and also that there is a sharp paranoia of grains in the diet.  The first aspect we are still unravelling, but the second is a much-easier takedown.  Which is why this article snooped is like a Snoop Oreo: creamy, up-yours goodness sandwiched between crunchy scientific fact!

It was the science of archeology – which has a high crossover into the humanities realms so under-serviced in the athletics world – that has brought this delightful snub to Paleo loyalists.  Seems that there is compelling evidence that ancient man definitely enjoyed himself some grains whenever he could get to them.  

The entire foundation of the anti-grain Paleo Diet stance is that our system was not developed to process so much grain.  Which is already a silly and tenuous claim, considering that humans have always opportunistic eaters – and thus why we have thrived in almost every climate and region on this planet.  But to have some as-hard-as-science-can-offer evidence that not only did grains help us progress, but were relevant to Paleolithic man really blows a hole in the wall of the temple of Paleo.